A few notes on making web sites

Tools for making webpages (web sites).

WordPress.

  • (blog) Posts – more timely, often shorter, specific to one topic. Have categories and tags.
  • Pages – often more long-term. Could be more lengthy. (Pages do not have categories or tags.)
  • Can use blocks or not use blocks
  • To edit, append /wp-admin (there is more than one editing environment)

Google Sites

  • Uses Blocks (blocks of code, of information on the webpage)
  • Uses pages (no posts yet)

Wix

Weebly

other

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Instrumental and Relational Understanding

Good article on instrumental and relational understanding.

Focus on Relational Understanding

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Putting Synthesis back in Bloom.

Benjamin Bloom published his taxonomy in 1956. In 2001, the categories were revised. Synthesis was taken out and Creating put in (among other smaller changes).

Erik Francis points out (article link below) the importance for learner to synthesize and puts it back in.  Creating is kept. Now there are 7 levels of understanding.

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/return-synthesis-connecting-critical-creative-thinking-francis/

 

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An angle inscribed in a semicircle

Hereis a tweet with a nice proof of the theorem that is the namesake of this website https://twitter.com/professorbrenda/status/1323095111954288640?s=21

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3 Great WIU Graduates Teaching MS Math

These guys are teaching math and helping students in many ways.

Read the full story here (from WIU website).

Read the full story here (from McDonough County Voice Newspaper).

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Tostitos fiesta bowl – some of the best highlights of all time

https://twitter.com/drolsen314/status/1282391894664851456?s=21

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Look at problems as a diamond, with multiple facets, and not as a coin, With only two sides

Quote

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Leadership is clarity, transparency, support, and trust

Leadership is

  • clarity, set goals & purpose. Cast a vision
  • transparency, Communication
  • support, Do you have tools
  • trust, and empower them to be creative, and failure is OK.

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Nathan Karsjens website

Nathan Karsjens website is https://mednathan.wordpress.com/

Nathan is a mathematics major in secondary teacher education at Western Illinois University (and a Leatherneck football player).

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Atmospheric Pressure, inches of Mercury, and Pascals

I got a smart watch for Christmas. It has a ‘compass’ that also shows my longitude, latitude, altitude, and the Atmospheric Pressure in hPA.

So I studied up on the units for Atmospheric Pressure. Disclaimer: This is crude. I want to get some numbers I can remember.

Pa is an SI unit for atmospheric pressure. It means Pascal. One Pascal is 1 Newton per square meter. hPa is hectopascal. 1 hPa = 100 Pa

The ‘Imperial’ (English) unit would be PSI (pounds per square inch). BTW, 1 PSI is quite a bit, but 1 Pascal isn’t much.

Often the weather person on television give the atmospheric pressure in inches of Mercury (inHg).

Conversions

1 inHg = 33.9 hPa
.02953 inHg = 1 hPa

Low, Regular, and High Pressure

1000 hPa (29.5 inHg) is low pressure.
1010 hPa (29.8 inHg) is ‘regular’ pressure.
1040 hPa (30.7 inHg) is high pressure.

The key is which direction is the barometric pressure going (rising or decreasing).

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